How to negotiate a work from home or remote working arrangement - SEEK Career Advice

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How to negotiate working from home

How to negotiate working from home

As technologies continue to evolve and business owners think more laterally about the definition of ‘work’, more and more employees are being given greater flexibility in where and when that work occurs.

The barriers that have previously limited employees from working from home are disappearing, and the old standard of staff spending 40 hours a week at the office is all but over. It’s being replaced by an increase in the number of New Zealand organisations embracing the benefits of work from home arrangements.

So, what are the benefits of working from home or working remotely?

  • Increased job satisfaction. Job satisfaction is a powerful tool. It helps contribute to productivity, keeps people motivated and engaged, increases staff retention, and generally creates a happier and more effective team.

    More and more flexible working arrangements such as the opportunity to work from home are being viewed as a major perk, and those who do work from home are reportedly more satisfied with their jobs. This can significantly contribute to higher staff retention rates, meaning you’re more likely to enjoy your job – and stay longer too!
     
  • Improved work-life balance. Today’s workforce is far more interested in creating a better balance between work and leisure than any generation before them. Research shows work-life balance to be one of the top three drivers attracting candidates to an organisation, and that an overwhelming 92% of candidates feel work-life balance would affect their decision to change jobs or careers.
     
  • Increased productivity. One of the greatest misconceptions about working from home is that it offers remote employees a chance to slack off. In fact, employees who telecommute may increase their productivity, given that they’re able to schedule their work towards the times of day they feel most effective – ensuring early birds and night owls alike are able to maximise their productivity. In addition, remote employees aren’t subject to the same interruptions they would be within an office environment.

How to score a work from home gig

Around 59% of employees consider flexible working arrangements such as the opportunity to work from home to be a major perk, and those who do are reportedly more satisfied with their jobs. This can significantly contribute to higher staff retention rates, meaning you’re more likely to enjoy your job – and stay longer too!
 
  • Improved work-life balance. Today’s workforce is far more interested in creating a better balance between work and leisure than any generation before them. Research shows work-life balance to be one of the top three drivers attracting candidates to an organisation, and that an overwhelming 92% of candidates feel work-life balance would affect their decision to change jobs or careers.
     
  • Increased productivity. One of the greatest misconceptions about working from home is that it offers remote employees a chance to slack off. In fact, employees who telecommute may increase their productivity, given that they’re able to schedule their work towards the times of day they feel most effective – ensuring early birds and night owls alike are able to maximise their productivity. In addition, remote employees aren’t subject to the same interruptions they would be within an office environment.
  • How to score a work from home gig

    Around 59% of employees consider flexible working arrangements such as the opportunity to work from home to be a major perk, and those who do are reportedly more satisfied with their jobs.

    Ready to embrace the benefits of working from home? Here’s how to negotiate a telecommute or remote working arrangement with your current boss or prospective employer.

    • If you’re a job seeker. Use SEEK’s keyword search function to explore roles mentioning the terms ‘telecommute’, ‘work from home’, and ‘work remotely’. Talk to recruiters about work from home opportunities in your industry – even those outside of your current location. The great thing about being able to work from home is that you can be based anywhere.
       
    • If you’re in the midst of the recruitment process. You know that part of the interview where you have an opportunity to ask questions? Use that time to ask the hiring manager or interview panel how they feel about remote working, and if there are opportunities for flexible working arrangements within the role.
       
    • If you’re looking to convince your current boss. Be well prepared before attempting to make your case. Consider which key benefits best apply to not only yourself but the organisation, and build a pitch around those. Focus on how working from home will benefit the company, and suggest a trial of one or two days a month to start.

      If your boss agrees, ensure you report back on how you feel your work from home trial went, and seek your boss’ feedback on how they feel it went and what could be improved should working from home become a more permanent arrangement.

    Ready to hit the ground running in a remote office role? Check out our insights on the five traits you need to work effectively from home.